Course Descriptions - Sustainability and Environmental Management

Required Supportive Core Courses

BIO2200 Humans and the Environment
4 semester hours
This course provides students with an overview of the relationship between humans and their environment. Specifically, the course will introduce students to the environmental problems that we face including human population growth, air pollution, water pollution, loss of biological diversity and energy usage, and discusses potential solutions to these problems. We also investigate local environmental issues. (Fall)
No prerequisites.
Meets General Education “Scientific Inquiry” requirement.

BUS3350 Consumer Behavior
3 semester hours
An investigation of behavior and communication research, appraising models, methodology, and concepts applicable to marketing. Designing marketing communication systems whose structure and output reflect a behavioral buying orientation toward the market place. Uses contemporary examples to illustrate consumer behavior models. (Fall)
Prerequisite: BUS2300.

NSM1300 Earth Science
4 semester hours
This course includes an overview of those sciences that collectively seek to understand our dynamic Earth and its relationship to the larger universe. Includes material from the fields of geology, oceanography, meteorology and astronomy through which we examine the physical laws and natural processes that have helped to shape and change the Earth and the universe around it.
No prerequisites.

NSM3100 Research and Writing Methods in the Natural Sciences
3 semester hours
Basic research methodology and the scientific method of inquiry for biological and natural science research are stressed. Concepts, methods, and experimental designs involved in the statistical evaluation and presentation of research data are evaluated and integrated into effective communication. Development of scientific proposals, revision of manuscripts, and scientific writing and bibliographic citation form the core of this Writing Intensive course. Course includes instruction in statistical and GIS software packages. (Spring)
Prerequisites: BIO1210 or equivalent; GEN1200 or equivalent; junior or senior with a minimum of 20 semester hours of coursework in the natural sciences.

Required Core Courses

SUS2100 Environmental Ethics
4 semester hours
This course is an introduction to environmental ethics in developed and developing countries. Lectures will emphasize current philosophical environmental ethics, understanding the values and responsibility of individuals toward the environment, and an understanding of how to balance the use of natural resources to development of sustainable approaches. The course will also focus on individual’s environmental ethics and obligations to dealing with environmental issues. In addition, view society’s movements and values toward these issues.
No prerequisites.

SUS2200 Environmental Chemistry
4 semester hours
This course is intended to provide students with a basic understanding of atmospheric chemistry principles, water chemistry principles and soil chemistry principles. Specifically, this course will use a quantitative approach to examining pollutants in air, water and soils. Students will develop skills for sampling, quantitative detection and data analysis in environmental chemistry. Students will have an understanding of biogeochemical cycles and human effects to these cycles.
No prerequisites.

SUS2300 Natural Resources Economics
4 semester hours
This course introduces the concepts and components of economics and dealing with non-recyclable, recyclable and replenishable resources. This course will discuss economic tools and techniques that can be used to make better management decisions, valuing the environment and dealing with environmental issues. Concepts of property rights, externalities, natural resource capital and markets will be discussed. This course will include case studies dealing with air pollution, water pollution, toxic substances and environmental justice in regard to risk.
No prerequisites.

SUS2400 Literature and the Environment
4 semester hours
This course examines the relationship between literature and the environment by addressing both stylistic and cultural concerns. In doing so, the course will examine the conventions of three major genres: poetry, fiction and non-fiction. Throughout the course, students will gain experience writing both about and in each of these literary genres in order to gain greater understanding of the relationship between literature and the environment.
No prerequisites.

SUS3100 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
4 semester hours
This course introduces the concepts and components of a geographic information system (GIS). It also teaches the essential skills of spatial data management, analysis, and visualization through the use of GIS software. Upon completion of this course, students will understand the fundamental concepts of GIS including spatial data models, spatial analysis and cartographic principles.
Prerequisite: Majors only or consent of instructor.

SUS3200 Ecology and Conservation Biology
4 semester hours
This course will provide an introduction to the ecology and conservation of natural resource. Basic principles of ecology and conservation techniques will be discussed with an emphasis on humans as part of this system. The course will utilize experiential methods in examining global and local ecosystem issues and current management practices.
Prerequisite: Majors only or consent of instructor.

SUS3300 Environmental Statistics
4 semester hours
This course introduces different types of statistical analyses used in the environmental field. This course will begin with basic concepts of statistics including formulating and testing hypothesis, random variables and inferential statistics. This course will also address more advanced topics including sampling design, limits of detection and spatial statistics. The course focuses on applications in a variety of different environmental fields.
Prerequisite: Majors only or consent of instructor.

SUS3400 Environmental Soils and Food Production
4 semester hours
This course is an introduction to urban and rural soil science. Lectures will emphasize the inter-relationships of hydrology, landforms, vegetation, climate, and geologic materials with soils. The course will also focus on using soil resource information in making wise land-use decisions. In addition, the impact of humans on soils will be discussed. Students will examine organic versus conventional food production.
Prerequisite: Majors only or consent of instructor.

SUS4100 Grant Writing and Fundraising
3 semester hours
This course prepares students for writing grants and participating in fundraising activities. The course will utilize experiential methods and real world examples in teaching the skills necessary to maximize successful outcomes in the grant writing process. Additionally, the course will teach fundamental components of the fundraising process through a combination of experiential learning and research instruction, as students participate in activities such as: designing newsletters or organizing and presenting in public forums.
Prerequisite: Majors only.

SUS4200 Water Resources and Environment
4 semester hours
This course is intended to provide students with a broader understanding of water as a natural resource and its importance to our lives and the Earth’s complex environment. Specifically, this course will cover physical properties of water, the hydrologic cycle, and issues related to water distribution, water usage, and water management. Students will understand the social/economical, legal, and political aspects of water resources.
Prerequisite: SUS2200.

SUS4300 Senior Capstone in Environmental Issues
4 semester hours
This course explores the interrelationships of the environment and society through the study of a complex problem that addresses issues of importance to the environment, ethics and society. Information regarding the problem will be gathered through: peer-reviewed sources, reliable news sources, personal communications and field experience. The course will culminate in a major presentation, project and written piece regarding both the research and field experience. (Fall)
Prerequisites: SUS3100, SUS3200, SUS3300, SUS3400.

SUS4400 Environmental Literacy and Critical Inquiry
3 semester hours
This course examines the relationship between contemporary environmental issues and effective argumentation. In doing so, the course will examine the conventions of environmental scientific, popular, philosophical and literary authors used in the presentation of various modes and contexts. Throughout the course, students will gain experience writing both about and in each of these modes in order to gain greater understanding of the relationship between rhetoric, argumentation and effective communication regarding environmental issues.
Prerequisite: ENG2010.

SUS4500 Environmental Management
4 semester hours
This course is designed to provide an overview of the environmental management of natural resources by addressing issues such as technical, political, administrative and social forces influencing the quality of the environment and the use of resources. It includes coverage of government and industrial programs to combat pollution of the air, soil and water, and the legislative and regulatory regimes.
Prerequisites: SUS3400, SUS4200.

SUS4600 Civilizations and Their Environment
4 semester hours
Through an historic and artistic lens, this course examines the interrelationship between civilizations and the environment on a global, national and local level. In doing so, the course will examine the relationship between the indigenous people and nature as well as that between developing nations and nature. In addition to this historical content, the course will look at the ways in which these relationships reflect the ideology behind contemporary man’s relationship with nature.
Prerequisite: Majors only.

SUS4700 Energy and Changing Technology
4 semester hours
This course introduces students to the latest research on evolving patterns of energy use and new energy producing and harnessing technologies. Historical examples of engineered projects, chemical processes or electronics which have changed to utilize fewer or more environmentally sustainable materials will be studied along with alternative energy, transportation planning and sustainable criteria for new construction and renovations. Social and technological changes and adaptations that human communities may have to make as the Earth’s climate continues to change in the coming years will be the focus of class projects.
Prerequisite: Majors only.

Academic information on departmental websites reflects the university's most current curriculum. The print version of the catalog, which is also posted online, may differ from this information.

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